The costs of coping with poor water supply in rural Kenya

As the disease burden of poor access to water and sanitation declines globally, the non-health costs––mainly the time spent collecting water—will likely grow in importance in sector investment analyses. Measuring these “coping costs” (which also include usage fees and capital costs for storage and treatment) among 387 households in rural Kenya found a median monthly cost of around US$20 (or 12% of cash income). The results suggest more attention should be directed to the non-health benefits of improved water supply as the sector defines and implements new sustainable development goals.

 

 

 

The costs of coping with poor water supply in rural Kenya. Joseph Cook, Peter Kimuyu, and Dale Whittington. 2016. Water Resources Research 52(2): 841-859. doi:10.1002/2015WR017468.